Archive for January 5, 2010


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Definitive List of The 99 Things You Should Have Already Experienced On The Internet
 Unless You’re a Loser or Old or Something

(In No Particular Order)

01) Grape Stomp
02) Charlie Bit Me
03) Chocolate Rain
04) Dancing Baby
05) Post Secret
06) Charlie The Unicorn
07) Mentos and Diet Coke
08) Numa Numa
09) Peanut Butter Jelly Time
10) George Lucas In Love
11) You’re The Man Now Dog
12) Yatta
13) Star Wars Kid
14) Bubb Rubb
15) The Flying Spaghetti Monster
16) Dramatic Chipmunk
17) Homestar Runner
18) GI Joe Pork Chop Sandwiches
19) Fail Blog
20) Skateboarding Dog
21) All Your Base Are Belong To Us
22) Winnebago Man
23) We Like The Moon
24) I Can Has Cheezburger
25) Barney Vs. Tupac
26) Shining
27) Cute Overload
28) Rick Roll
29) Lazy Sunday
30) David After The Dentist
31) Powerthirst
32) Christian The Lion
33) Bert and Ernie Rap
34) Lady Punch
35) Leprechaun in Alabama
36) Where The Hell Is Matt
37) Boom Goes The Dynamite
38) Breakdancing Baby
39) Drunk Jeff Goldblum
40) Scarlet Takes A Tumble
41) Susan Boyle
42) Gay Mount Everest
43) Afro Ninja
44) Cop Shoots Himself In Leg In Classroom
45) Tron Guy
46) “Leave Britney Alone”
47) Laughing Baby
48) I’m the Juggernaut Bitch
49) Exploding Whale
50) Take On Me The Literal Version
51) Bill O’Reilly Flips Out
52) Don’t Tase Me Bro
53) The Landlord
54) Breakdancing Baby Kick
55) The Pet Penguin
56) Ms. South Carolina Answers A Question
57) I’m F*#king Matt Damon
58) Will It Blend
59) Spaghetti Cat
60) Tom Cruise Kills Oprah
61) Little Superstar
62) Chad Vader
63) Pretty Much Everywhere It’s Going To Be Hot
64) I Like Turtles
65) Who Needs A Movie
66) Jake E. Lee Shreds
67) Hawaii Chair
68) Aussie Party
69) Hitler Plans Burning Man
70) Montgomery Flea Market
71) Look At The Horse
72) Asian Backstreet Boys
73) Leroy Jenkins
74) Pinky The Cat
75) Monkey Sniffs Finger
76) Sneezing Panda
77) Prison Inmates remake “Thriller”
78) Techno Viking
79) Ask A Ninja
80) Best Man Trips and Ruins Wedding
81) Best Wedding Toast Ever (Amy’s Song)
82) Kitten Surprise (how to break up a cat fight)
83) Katana Sword Infomercial Goes Wrong
84) Matrix Ping Pong
85) La Pequena Prohibida
86) Angry German Kid (translated)
87) Evolution of Dance
88) Ok Go “Here It Goes Again”
89) Battle at Kruger (lions vs. buffalos vs. crocodiles)
90) Daft Hands
91) Human Beatbox
92) Most T-Shirts Worn At Once
93) Zero G Dog
94) Cuppy Cakes Song
95) George Washington
96) Scary Maze Prank
97) Gay Referee
98) Tranquilized Bear Hits Trampoline
99) Reporter Gets A Fly In The Mouth

                 History Of Electronics

 

                                                                                                                                                         

                                          The history of electronics is a story of the twentieth century and three key components—the vacuum tube, the transistor, and the integrated circuit. In 1883, Thomas Alva Edison discovered that electrons will flow from one metal conductor to another through a vacuum. This discovery of conduction became known as the Edison effect. In 1904, John Fleming applied the Edison effect in inventing a two-element electron tube called a diode, and Lee De Forest followed in 1906 with the three-element tube, the triode. These vacuum tubes were the devices that made manipulation of electrical energy possible so it could be amplified and transmitted.

                                           The first applications of electron tubes were in radio communications. Guglielmo Marconi pioneered the development of the wireless telegraph in 1896 and long-distance radio communication in 1901. Early radio consisted of either radio telegraphy (the transmission of Morse code signals) or radio telephony (voice messages). Both relied on the triode and made rapid advances thanks to armed forces communications during World War I. Early radio transmitters, telephones, and telegraph used high-voltage sparks to make waves and sound. Vacuum tubes strengthened weak audio signals and allowed these signals to be superimposed on radio waves. In 1918, Edwin Armstrong invented the “super-heterodyne receiver” that could select among radio signals or stations and could receive distant signals. Radio broadcasting grew astronomically in the 1920s as a direct result. Armstrong also invented wide-band frequency modulation (FM) in 1935; only AM or amplitude modulation had been used from 1920 to 1935.

                                            Communications technology was able to make huge advances before World War II as more specialized tubes were made for many applications. Radio as the primary form of education and entertainment was soon challenged by television, which was invented in the 1920s but didn’t become widely available until 1947. Bell Laboratories publicly unveiled the television in 1927, and its first forms were electromechanical. When an electronic system was proved superior, Bell Labs engineers introduced the cathode ray picture tube and color television. But Vladimir Zworykin, an engineer with the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), is considered the “father of the television” because of his inventions, the picture tube and the iconoscope camera tube.

                                               Development of the television as an electronic device benefitted from many improvements made to radar during World War II. Radar was the product of studies by a number of scientists in Britain of the reflection of radio waves. An acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging, radar measures the distance and direction to an object using echoes of radio microwaves. It is used for aircraft and ship detection, control of weapons firing, navigation, and other forms of surveillance. Circuitry, video, pulse technology, and microwave transmission improved in the wartime effort and were adopted immediately by the television industry. By the mid-1950s, television had surpassed radio for home use and entertainment.

                                                    After the war, electron tubes were used to develop the first computers, but they were impractical because of the sizes of the electronic components. In 1947, the transistor was invented by a team of engineers from Bell Laboratories. John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley received a Nobel prize for their creation, but few could envision how quickly and dramatically the transistor would change the world. The transistor functions like the vacuum tube, but it is tiny by comparison, weighs less, consumes less power, is much more reliable, and is cheaper to manufacture with its combination of metal contacts and semiconductor materials.

                                                    The concept of the integrated circuit was proposed in 1952 by Geoffrey W. A. Dummer, a British electronics expert with the Royal Radar Establishment. Throughout the 1950s, transistors were mass produced on single wafers and cut apart. The total semiconductor circuit was a simple step away from this; it combined transistors and diodes (active devices) and capacitors and resistors (passive devices) on a planar unit or chip. The semiconductor industry and the silicon integrated circuit (SIC) evolved simultaneously at Texas Instruments and Fairchild Semiconductor Company. By 1961, integrated circuits were in full production at a number of firms, and designs of equipment changed rapidly and in several directions to adapt to the technology. Bipolar transistors and digital integrated circuits were made first, but analog ICs, large-scale integration (LSI), and very-large-scale integration (VLSI) followed by the mid-1970s. VLSI consists of thousands of circuits with on-and-off switches or gates between them on a single chip. Microcomputers, medical equipment, video cameras, and communication satellites are only examples of devices made possible by integrated circuits